Monthly Archives: May 2017

Different food, Beda Place Storage in Fridge

HABITS after spending large amounts of food so it is put in the refrigerator. In fact, different types of food, storage is also different in the refrigerator to keep it fresh.

Following proper food storage location in the refrigerator.

Fruits and vegetables
Fruits and vegetables can last longer when stored in damp places. Keep container in the fridge, which is in the fruit and vegetable drawers.

It’s also important to separate the storage of fruits vegetables. Most fruits out of gas called ethylene, and many types of vegetables that are sensitive to the gas, which easily rot.

Most importantly, do not also store fruit or fresh vegetables to an airtight container as it will make it wilt and rot quickly. Instead, dispose of vegetables and fruits that are bruised or rotten so not to contaminate others.

dairy
Put the milk and yogurt on the shelf above the refrigerator or the center. Keep dairy products from strong-smelling foods which can damage it.

While, put eggs on the lower shelf so as not to lose moisture or absorb unwanted flavors. Such as fruit and vegetables, cheese needed a warm place, so it should be put in the drawer with the right humidity.

Meat and seafood
Meat and seafood should be stored in the bottom of the refrigerator shelves. Make sure the food is always separate from other foods to prevent cross-contamination.

seasoning
Seasoning will not last long in the refrigerator due to frequent use, so you should place it on a shelf in the refrigerator where the temperature is always fluctuating up and down.

leftovers
In order to be able to enjoy the rest of the food before it spoils, place it on a shelf where you can see it, such as the top or middle shelf. If you’ve passed four days and you do not eat it, put it in the freezer to keep them fresh or you should discard it.

Specialty Coffee – A Vibrant Industry, Or The Future Of Coffee At Crossroads Of Change?

Seattle; the home of Boeing, software giants, grunge music and…specialty coffee. Well, not quite. Contrary to popular belief, while Pearl Jam, Nirvana and Boeing and Oracle do indeed hail from the Pacific Northwest, modern specialty coffee has its roots much further south.

When Alfred Peet died in his sleep a few weeks ago he was a sprightly 87. He passed away peacefully hopefully dreaming of coffee trees laden with ripened cherries. While most people have never heard of him, Peet is widely recognised as being the father of modern “specialty coffee” in the industry. He was a Dutchman who became an American. He had traded tea for Lipton’s in Java, lived in Sumatra, worked in the business in New Zealand before, finally, settling down (somewhat) in the University suburb of Berkeley, California. It was at Berkeley where he founded his roastery in 1966 and Peet’s Coffee was born. Alfred Peet was passionate about coffee. His roasting exploits legendary and his ability to commentate, roast and put out fires simultaneously are famous. His experiences while living in Indonesia had given him an affinity with farmers who grew coffee, as well as a thorough understanding of the origin, the place where coffee was grown. This background, combined with his love of roasting, resulted in a place where coffee was not just a cup of Java, but something exotic, living and with a story.

From Alfred Peet’s inspirational example came many of the coffee cultures that now are household names today in America and around the world- Starbucks being the most famous of these of course. The original founders of Starbucks- Baldwin, Bowker and Ziv Seigel originally leant their roasting trade from Peet, in fact Peet roasted for them in their early years. Many others in the industry in America today also passed through the Peet’s Coffee experience. In fact when Howard Schulz purchased Starbucks, Bowker and Baldwin moved across and purchased Peets Coffee- Alfred Peet retiring to a role of Coffee Mentor for the Industry as a whole.

Today most coffee drinkers, from Surabaya to San Francisco, recognise Starbucks and its logo, but the name “Alfred Peet” often draws draws blank looks.

Specialty Coffee today is at a crossroad- an important junction in deciding which direction coffee will be heading over the next decade. In the last 10 years many new comers have entered the business. It is estimated that the global coffee sector today is valued at over US$80 billion. It is no wonder that with these revenue numbers, the industry attracts a mix of business people with mixed agendas- who often see the potential bottom line rather than education and passion as being the driving force in what they do. Traditionally the specialty coffee industry has been built on the strong foundation of sharing knowledge and experience- with the supposition that by helping each other the industry will be strongly quality focused. However a number of the more recent arrivals in the market are perhaps choosing coffee for the perceived easy profits, rather than for a real passion for coffee or its heritage. As a result many of the traditional methods of exchange are not as effective, or used as frequently as they have been in the past.

Globally Coffee is in a position where consumption is beginning to slow down and opportunities to grow coffee are becoming more difficult to find in the traditional coffee consuming markets- Europe, USA, South America and Oceania. The easy answer if to look at new emerging markets- China, India, Pakistan and Indonesia are prime targets. These countries either have low coffee consumption (Indonesian’s, for instance, consume 500gm per person per year vs. Norway’s 12kg per person per year), or have reasonable consumption, but historically are tea consumers (India). The new markets are also very suggestible to western branding- in many cases the strength of branding has been shown to be more important than the product itself. This presents a number of opportunities to strong western brands and of course new local brands to emerge. However it does not necessarily equate to long-term longevity of specialty coffee in these new frontiers.

In the more mature markets, the patterns of consumption have changed markedly over the last 15-20 years. The traditional, lower quality coffee products such as instants, are being replaced by roast and ground coffee (drips, plungers etc) and of course Espresso Based Drinks (cappuccino, latte, espresso etc). Fresh roasted coffee has many advantages over the instant coffee. It is more flavoursome and more importantly has a greater link back to where it originally came from. This means that customer awareness is also on the increase- bringing into the spotlight the actual paper trail of where the coffee comes from, who picked it, what price the grower get from it etc. To consumers in countries such as New Zealand this is very important- as generally there is a linkage between quality of coffee and the return the farmer or grower gets. The correlation is the better the return to a farmers, the better the coffee will be. Higher returns means more time can be spent in the origin country looking after the crop, pruning, selective harvesting, proper intensive drying and packing/storing the coffee once it is dried.

The role the specialty coffee industry plays in all this is very important. Retail shops that source and supply only the best coffee help to sustain the industry both upstream and downstream. This means the farmers and workers will be rewarded and the consumers will have access to quality coffee, hopefully growing the business further.

Unfortunately the reverse is gradually becoming more often the norm. Cafes, coffee shops and roasters entering the market all over the world tend to look for short-term cost advantages to try and fuel their business models. To achieve this they either buy poor quality coffee, as cheap as possible or average quality coffee…likewise as cheaply as possible. Cheap coffee equates to, at the best, very average finished product. This in turn means generally a poor perception of the place selling the coffee. This would perhaps be OK if there were not so many cafes now selling poor quality coffee. As it is it means that poor quality coffee is often accepted a being the norm- hence having the result of putting people off drinking coffee.

In many ways the industry can be seen as having come almost full circle back to where it was in the early 1970’s when instant coffee and coffee sitting on hotplates for 10 hours were seen and accepted as being normal coffee. This is what pioneers like Peet worked so hard to change. It is also why the crossroads the industry now stands at are so important.

The choices are really quite simple. For coffee to evolve and grow further there needs to be education of the retailer and the customer. The global industry is built around national organisations that play a varying role in providing advice and education to those in retail or wholesale. The Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) and the SCAE (Specialty Coffee Association of Europe) are two such organisations. However to become members of these organisations is as simple as filling out a form and paying a fee. Often the motivation of the people joining is just to get a sticker to put on their shop door, knowledge is a secondary motivator. There is talk that membership should involve some form of basic enter test and then continuing education via the internet- which would at least help to provide tools to pass information on to those drinking the coffee.

Looking at those in the industry who do things well, is also a great way of building and planning the future for specialty coffee. In the USA quality roasters and café operators such as Allegro, Blackstump Coffee and Intelligensia have taken industry standards to a new level. Buying quality coffee, hiring quality staff and imparting quality knowledge to customers buying their morning coffee has proven very successful for these companies. So much so that it is an unquestionable part of their corporate culture. All of these companies also practice something unique- they regularly visit their growers in countries such as Indonesia, Guatemala, Kenya, Brazil and Colombia. To take this one step further, they do not just visit and spend a few nights- taking photos of a grower’s coffee trees, they maintain regular contact with those growing the coffee. This approach must be seen as the future for coffee in competitive, quality driven markets. It is true relationship coffee where the roaster becomes by default part of the farmers extended family.

Passing knowledge on to those who buy a coffee everyday, and arming them with information on what type of coffee they drink, how it is grown, who grows it, when it is picked, how it gets to them gives all power to the customer. It is a very important, yet lagging piece of the future of coffee globally. Being able to learn the differences in tastes/cupping qualities has some snob quality, but more importantly it helps the buyer to differentiate between good, average and poor coffee. Here lies the problem. A successful café founded on the principles of sustainability and true coffee culture has nothing to fear from education. A café selling poor quality coffee is unlikely, or perhaps unable, to want to educate clients about quality.

A failure to address quality, education and sustainability in the business sector (from the farmer to the retail customer) will ultimately result in consumption patterns falling further. Quality issues- especially over the counter and in the cup, need to be addressed. If not unfortunately those to suffer will be the grower or origin country, rather than the retailer. With current economics a grower in Indonesia receives only around 2-5% of the cost of the average cup sold in America or Europe. If demand drops off, the Arabica business ultimately will fall back into a cycle of commodity pricing rather than specialty pricing that many quality origins now enjoy. Competition from other beverages, and lifestyle choices, compete with the disposable income that coffee comes from.

If Alfred Peet was still alive, undoubtedly he would just carry on doing what he did well and loved, roasting coffee and sharing his knowledge and experience with anyone willing, and wanting to learn and listen- a model to all of us in the industry today.

© Alun H.G Evans, Merdeka Coffee, 2007. The writer reserves all moral rights to this article. May only be reproduced.

Achieve Your Diet and Fat Loss Goals Faster

Food – none of us can go without it! But how does the way in which we think about food impact our diet? Are you someone who just sees food as body fuel, or do the different tastes, textures and nutritional values of food excite you? In today’s health conscious world, I would think that most of us fall into the latter group. If you want to achieve your diet goals quicker, then you need to clearly understand you relationship with food.

Eat and Burn

In its simplest form, food gives our body the calories it needs to run on a daily basis. When there are too few calories, the body looks to its own reserves. When there are too many calories, the body puts them away in storage (i.e. as body fat). On a purely mathematical level, so long as we burn as much as we consume, we are not going to produce excess body fat. So yes it is possible to eat junk food and stay thin but we also know that what food we eat can be as important as how much food we eat.

Food Fanatics

Not all foods are created equal. It would be nonsense to say that a caramel flapjack and an organic apple containing the same number of calories are of equal health benefit. At the ‘eat and burn’ basic level then yes they might provide our body with the same number of calories but substance is surely just as important. We have all learned that the organic apple is bursting with healthy goodness, whilst the flapjack will be laden with sugar and other nutritional nastiness.

The food world has gone crazy over the past few years. Every other program on television is a cooking program. But why are we so obsessed? It is just body fuel at the end of the day…

I have to admit, I am a modern day ‘foodie’. I love cooking and experimenting in the kitchen and I strongly believe in the health benefits of natural food. In my eyes, there is nothing wrong with this, food has the fantastic ability of making us happy so let’s take advantage. However, you need to be aware of your root relationship with food. There is definitely a risk of obsessing over food. Such obsession may manifest itself as punishing yourself for eating ‘junk’ food, a lifetime of calorie counting, or possibly worse. We each have unique relationships with food and to get the most from food we should strip away the layers and get to the bottom of what and why. Why did you have to eat popcorn whilst watching that movie yesterday evening? Why did you have to drink alcohol when socialising last week? It is good to sit back and think about our food choices so we understand why we made them and can enjoy those choices instead of feeling guilty about them!

Strategies to Avoid Food Obsession and Achieve Your Diet Goals

As we are dependent upon food for survival, all of us have a relationship with food.

Here are a few ideas to help you find out, change, and nurture your food relationship.

  • Make a Black, Grey, White list of foods you commonly eat. Black for the least healthy, White for the most. Then keep it in your kitchen, making sure that your cupboards are full of those foods on the White list (typically fresh fruit, vegetables, unsalted nuts and seeds, whilst trying to cut out those on the Black list (basically anything processed containing sugar, as well as alcohol and if you follow the Paleo diet, then all grains too). To take things further, you can keep a score board to measure how many food items from each colour group you are eating – monitoring your results forces the truth upon you, so there is nowhere to hide!
  • Work out what type of food personality you are. Do this by clearly identifying what you enjoy about food. For me, I know that eating healthily will make me feel happy but so does the odd treat. I have a soft spot for beer and ice cream (not together though!), so I indulge in these things every now and again. It may be that you enjoy a certain type of cuisine, or need to eat every two hours. Being aware of your food personality will help you identify your strengths and weaknesses in your diet, which you can then address sensibly instead of obsessively.
  • Be wise about food availability – possibly the most important factor in keeping a healthy diet is to always have the healthy food readily to hand. Most people resort to less healthy foods because they are so accessible. A little bit of effort on your part and healthy food can be fast food in any hectic lifestyle. Prepare your healthy food in advance and keep stock levels high (i.e. always have fresh fruit and vegetables at the ready).
  • Equally, if it isn’t in your house in the first place then you can’t eat it! If you don’t have very strong willpower, avoid the lethal step of bringing junk foods into your home. Too often I have picked things up and thought it would be saved for a rainy day but the evenings are full of temptation and before you know it that treat is in your belly. I know that keeping sweet food in the house can undo my healthy eating, so it’s best kept out most of the time.

Free Your Food, Do Not Trap it with Rules

The key to making healthy eating a lifestyle choice and not a short term diet is to make it fun and enjoyable, not boring and burdensome! I think adopting a ‘rule free’ food psychology is more realistic than to simply ban certain foods altogether. To be truthful, we all fall off the healthy eating bandwagon. In my eyes, this can be a good thing providing that you that you do enjoy your treats (e.g. cake) that you consume otherwise what is the point!? Don’t worry and just get right back on track instead of dwelling on that junk food.

Please find more information about the ability of food to change your mood on my website, where I have given examples of foods that could help you achieve your diet goals.

Luke Moghaddas-Davies – A fitness enthusiast who has trained for over 12 years and believes everyone should take ownership of their health and achieve their fitness goals – no excuses! By making healthy living more realistic, and for me that means ‘rule free’, I know how to stay lean and fit for life not just for summer!

Gourmet Coffee Habit Costing Consumers as Much as $1,500 Yearly

Gourmet coffee consumers rarely consider the cost of their
daily coffee in terms of the expense to brew premium whole
bean coffee at home (50 cents to 75 cents) with prices of
a pound of gourmet coffee beans versus a two or three cup
a day ($4.50 to $6.00) coffee drinking habit when purchased
at premium coffee houses. A recent Washington Post article
discussed Seattle law students spending money from their
student loans for Starbucks coffee across the street from
the Seattle University School of Law.

Erika Lim, director of career services at the law school has
launched a campaign to reduce coffee consumption by students
attending the university on student loan money. She points
out that students are spending education loans on luxuries
like latte instead of necessities like a loaf of bread. That
borrowed money takes years to repay and many students don’t
do the math to see that study time with 2-3 cups of coffee
at Starbucks over 4 years can cost them significant sums –
as much as $4500 in principle, interest and fees on their
student loan – over the course of their education. An
online calculator has been posted for those interested in
calculating their caffeine expenses at:
http://www.hughchou.org/calc/coffee.cgi

Gourmet Coffee drinkers have become accustomed to paying $2
or more per cup for fresh brewed coffees at Premium coffee
houses – and many sources are predicting those prices may
increase to as much as $4 per cup soon due to expected
increases in green coffee prices. But smart gourmet coffee
consumers have long known that premium coffee brewed at home
costs just 12 cents or so per cup, depending on preferences
for coffee strength.

Many coffee producers recommend starting with 1 tablespoon
of fresh ground gourmet coffee beans per standard 6 ounce
cup of water. Starbucks recommends double that amount for
stronger coffees at 2 tablespoons per 6 ounce cup. A pound
of gourmet coffee (that is 16 Ounces or 1 Lb.) divided
by 1 1/2 Ounces comes to roughly 10 pots of 10 cups
(6 Ounce cups) equaling 100 cups for the cost of one pound
of gourmet coffee beans. At the average of 1.5 tablespoons
per 6 ounce cup and average size of 12 ounce coffee mug,
you can expect 50 cups of home brewed coffee per pound of
gourmet beans!

Prices of premium gourmet coffee beans range between $10
and $18 per pound, making a cup of home-brewed gourmet
coffee, made fresh to your liking, cost only between .10
cents and .25 cents per cup or between $1.00 and $2.00 per
pot of coffee! Even the rarest and most expensive coffee
sold, the exotic Kopi Luwak, at $175 per pound, is still
less than $1.75 per 6 ounce cup when brewed at home! So
if you have expensive tastes and want a 12 ounce mug of
the rarest and most expensive coffee on the planet, you
still need only pay what some premium coffee houses charge
for a latte ($3.50) for that rare privilege.

When consumers learn that they can purchase gourmet whole
bean coffee for between $10 to $18 per pound, then fresh
grind and brew at home for significantly less than gourmet
coffee companies charge, many see home brewing premium
gourmet coffee as luxurious treat. Purchasing a thermos
or a large travel mug to take coffee with them from home
makes drinking rich, fresh roasted coffee a possibility
for about one-seventh the cost of buying that coffee from
expensive and crowded coffee shops.

Many so-called premium coffee houses keep their coffee
heated on warmers after brewing, but this practice causes
the flavor to turn bitter after less than an hour of
warming. It is actually more likely you will get a rich
flavorful cup of coffee from an insulated thermos or
insulated type pump containers. Reheating coffee can
destroy the flavor of good gourmet coffee – just as quickly
as extensive warming.

Coffee purists prefer to make individual cups with a coffee
press, fresh grinding beans for each cup and drinking the
entire amount brewed before it turns cold to get the maximum
enjoyment from their beans. Microwave a good cup of coffee
that has gone cold and you’ll see how much better it is
freshly brewed. Using good clean, fresh water is essential
since coffee is 99% water and bad tasting tap water can
quickly ruin even the best fresh ground beans.

You can enjoy great gourmet coffee more and pay less for the
privilege by starting with whole beans and grinding them
yourself with a $20 coffee grinder. Make only what you can
drink or carry with you in a nice thermos or travel mug
instead of reheating coffee later. Use good tasting water
and keep your brewing equipment clean to prevent the
rancid bitterness that can come from previous grounds in
crevices.

You can brew at home with fine gourmet coffee beans, fresh
ground and brewed in a French press coffee maker, carry a
fancy thermos of great coffee to work or school and enjoy
the best coffee available for far less money than you would
spend at crowded and expensive premium coffee house.

© Copyright 2005 http://www.TastesofTheWorld.net

5 Unique Ways to preserve food

Most hated it when food was coveted proved to be stale even before it got eaten. Is not there a way to make food more long-standing so it can be enjoyed?

There. Some people found a way to preserve food freshness and make more long-standing. This of course also makes age consumption becoming longer. There are several ways that make sense, some are not. And some ways this is a unique way some people used to preserve food.

Buried

It feels terrible to imagine burying food then one day he unloaded from ‘grave’ and eat it. However, this method is still used today and is practiced in Korea know.

Is a way of preserving foods passed down by ancestors Kimchi Korea in order to stay fresh longer and age consumption. Initially, the land provided to bury kimchi salted or frozen, making it warm and dark place.

Then, kimchi jars put into dirt that protects from dust, light and oxygen can alter food. Left for several months, kimchipun eventually be consumed and stored in the fridge or cupboard to be enjoyed not just a day.

Dried

Remember how to manufacture salted fish? Yes, that’s right. By drying in the sun. Reportedly, meat drying in the sun after being given some of the material will make it dry naturally and automatically preserved. This food can then be consumed for some time due to decay very long walk.

Usually the food is processed in this way is bananas for sale, and meat or fish.

Using a technique Lye

Itself is a kind of alkaline lye whose function is similar to that used soap to dry clean or cleaner. When consumed immediately Lye is very toxic and dangerous, but Lye can be used to preserve food.

When combined with fat, it will react by starting the process of saponification. These reactions can usually change the texture, aroma and taste of the food, but will age much longer.

Not everyone should and can use Lye. And only a few foods that can be processed by Lye as changes they experienced.

Confit

Confit method is a method to cut her off oxygen so slow decay that occurs in food. Usually the food will be cooled and sealed in a container.

Aspic

Aspic is a method of preserving food with a texture similar chemicals similar to jelly. When applied to food, it will wrap around and be absorbed by the food and protect food from oxidation. Food will remain durable for longer.

Today, there are many ways a more modern food preservation. Even so, some food preservation methods above are still used.

Is there a way of preserving foods typical of the territory?

New Year Resolution to Lose Weight and Get Fit

With the forthcoming New Year, many people make New Year Resolutions. The most popular new year resolutions are to lose weight, get fit, eat right and reduce stress.

All these four goals are actually intrinsically linked to one another. The lose weight, you must start to exercise more (get fit) and start to eat healthier, more nutritious foods to provide you with the energy required to be more active, without putting on even more weight. It is worth reminding you here that to lose weight may actually require you to eat a little more in the long term, assuming you do not exercise now. Stress can be caused by many factors, but generally people that feel that they are in greater control of their personal lives find it easier to control stress in their working lives. So being more confident as a result of being fitter and healthier can lead to a reduction in stress. So, how do you stick to the plan?

Let’s break the resolutions down, and look at each in isolation.

Lose Weight
OK, as already mentioned, to lose weight we merely need to increase physical activity and eat a healthier, more balanced diet. The best way to do this is to set yourself goals. If you know that your diet is not ideal, but are not sure exactly where you are going wrong, then you must keep a food diary for a couple of weeks at the start of the New Year. This will quickly highlight where you are going wrong. Make sure that you write down everything that you eat and drink during these two weeks. It is best to keep a note of when you eat too, so that at the end of the two weeks you will have a picture of your eating habits in the morning, afternoon and evening. Many people eat too much in the evening after a busy and stressful day. This is most likely going to be the area you need to concentrate on!

Get Fit
Getting fit is a life long goal for many people. So how do you stick to a New Year resolution to get fit? The best way is to set goals, write an exercise schedule (and stick to it) and keep a training diary.

Goals
Goals can be based on endurance (exercising for longer periods each session), strength (lifting heavier weights, or lifting more repetitions of the same weight), frequency (exercising more often, such as 3 times a week, twice a day). When setting goals, always set goals that are attainable. If you have not exercised for 5 years, then setting a goal of running 5 miles a day by the end of January, or running in the London Marathon in the Spring, will be very difficult to achieve. And failing your own goals does you no good regarding self esteem and motivation. So keep the goals simple. My personal goals generally include the following:

1. Exercising more each week (by attending an extra kick boxing class, or by going for a run at the weekends).

2. Lifting heavier weights – when weight training it is impossible to achieve this goal without a lot of hard work, so again I do not specify how much heavier the weights should be, but simply be happy if they are heavier after a month.

3. Performing more repetitions of an exercise. This is very useful when doing circuit training in the gym or at home. For example, you could aim to do one more repetition each day you exercise. This seems like a very small increase, but if you exercise 3 times a week, with just press ups, sit ups, star jumps and squat thrusts, and you start by performing 10 exercises of each in one session, then by the end of January you will be performing 22 of each. By the end of February it will have increased to about 35 of each, and by the time spring comes you will be performing maybe over 50 repetitions of each exercise 3 or 4 times a week. So, small incremental increases are to way to make steady, attainable, progress.

4. Exercising for longer. This can again apply to circuit training at home, such as exercising for an extra 5 minutes each session each week. So start by exercising for 15 minutes, and by the spring you will be exercising for 1 hour and 20 minutes each session, which could be 3 times a week! You will soon get fit, if you stick to the plan!. If you prefer to cycle, run, walk or swim for fitness, then the same applies. Spend a little more time each week, and the improvements will keep coming.

Eat Healthier
This is possible the hardest thing to do well. Most people are well aware of what food is good for them, and what is not. If you are unsure check out our diet pages. The problem is sticking to the plan.

 

Coffee For Your Health

Many of us rely on coffee to get us going in the mornings, wake us up in the afternoons, and prepare us for that special business meeting. Go ahead, have a cup of coffee. It’s much healthier than you may be thinking right now.

Coffee is the most consumed beverage in the world. No matter where you go, coffee is usually available. Yet, until recently there’s been very little research on the effects of coffee on our health. The researcher’s are waking up however. There have recently been studies completed on a variety of health benefits to drinking that simply delicious cup of coffee.

In a study in Italy, it was proven that that brewed coffee contains many antioxidants and consumption of antioxidant-rich brewed coffee may inhibit diseases caused by oxidative damages. When compared to other caffeine containing beverages like tea and cocoa, coffee proved to be the best in helping to prevent disease.

Caffeine in Coffee – Good or Bad?

The caffeine in coffee has often been a source of concern for many. Most people have problems sleeping when they drink coffee right before bedtime. Others will drink coffee to give them that boost of energy caffeine provides. Some even feel their heart rate increase if they drink too much coffee.

Did you know there are also benefits to the caffeine found in coffee? Coffee intake ( due to the caffeine) was associated with a significantly lower risk for Alzheimer’s Disease, independently of other possible confounding variables. These results, with future prospective studies, may have a major impact on the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.

Another benefit of drinking coffee has been studied in China. Their research clinically proved the caffeine in coffee helps to prevent Parkinson’s disease. Many of us have been led to believe that caffeine is bad for us. True enough, large quantities may hurt us, but the evidence is strong for the benefits it provides.

Coffee – Healthy Tonic for the Liver?

Studies completed in Japan indicated that people who drink more than a cup of coffee a day are less likely to develop liver cancer than those who do not, Japanese researchers say. Coffee also helped lower the risk of cirrhosis of the liver. Chlorogenic acid present in coffee beans has been proven in studies to also reduce the risk of liver cancer.

Harvard Medical School completed a study in 2004 that strongly suggest coffee has preventative qualities for Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. The authors found an inverse association between coffee intake and type 2 diabetes after adjustment for age, body mass index, and other risk factors. Total caffeine intake from coffee and other sources was associated with a statistically significantly lower risk for diabetes in both men and women. These data suggest that long-term coffee consumption is associated with a statistically significantly lower risk for type 2 diabetes.

Coffee and Physical Fitness

The amounts of water, carbohydrate and salt that athletes are advised to consume during exercise are based upon their effectiveness in preventing both fatigue as well as illness due to hyperthermia, dehydration or hyper hydration. The old issues concerning coffee and caffeine were that it acts as a diuretic, thus causing more fluid loss during activity. Studies have caused researchers to re think this point. These studies suggest that consuming caffeine does not have this effect and can even have beneficial effects on keeping the body fit.

Caffeine does not improve maximal oxygen capacity directly, but could permit the athlete to train at a greater power output and/or to train longer. It has also been shown to increase speed and/or power output in simulated race conditions. These effects have been found in activities that last as little as 60 seconds or as long as 2 hours. There is less information about the effects of caffeine on strength; however, recent work suggests no effect on maximal ability, but enhanced endurance or resistance to fatigue. There is no evidence that caffeine ingestion before exercise leads to dehydration, ion imbalance, or any other adverse effects.

Raw food, less water

When you start eating more raw foods, you may find you’re not as thirsty or don’t need as much water or other beverages as you normally do. There are several reasons for this.

First of all, raw foods, such as raw fruits and vegetables have a higher volume of water in them, so your body is getting the hydration it needs from foods.

This doesn’t mean you should stop drinking water or juices. You don’t want to adopt some of the more radical elements of the raw food trend. First and foremost, listen to your body. It will tell you what it needs. If you’re overweight, sluggish, tired, depressed, your body might be telling you to make some dietary changes, and raw foods might be one way to alleviate some physical disorders.

But if you’re overweight and have symptoms of Type II diabetes, overwhelming thirst can be one symptom. When you start consuming more raw foods, with a higher fiber and moisture content, you may start to lose weight, and that can go a long way to reducing your blood sugars.

If you’re not overweight, or don’t have Type II diabetes, you still might find you’re not as thirsty as you normally are. First of all, if you’re drinking water and juices, you’re not consuming caffeine, which is so dehydrating and makes you thirstier. And by not consuming as much in the way of cooked foods or especially highly processed foods, which have astronomical sodium counts, you won’t be as thirsty either.

By consuming more raw, uncooked food, and pure water and fruit juices, you’re putting your body into balance. Keeping sodium to normal levels found in foods means you’ll start to require a more balanced amount of water. Don’t think of this as changing or taking away. Think of it as adding balance, and it will make the process of eating healthier much easier.

Physical Fitness Training Career

Today, the awareness about physical fitness is quite common and widespread among common public. Generally, people are genuinely concerned about their fitness levels. Previously gymnasiums were mainly intended for athletic people who wanted to develop a masculine physique. Most of these gymnasiums have metamorphosed into health clubs where one can find people from all walks of life: from students to retired professionals. This heightened interest in fitness has opened up one more avenue in the ever-increasing job market. Fitness trainers are in great demand now.

At present, fitness trainers are required in health clubs, star hotels, tourist resorts, and in luxury cruise lines. Rich and famous people like sports persons and film stars hire personal fitness trainers. But that is usually reserved for well-known and experienced trainers. Most people tend to start their own health club or fitness center after getting some experience in any of the above-mentioned institutions. Another attractive proposition is running a fitness consultancy. A fitness consultant provides training to individuals for maintaining a certain level of fitness. The services of fitness consultants are hired by large private companies and charity organizations working in the field of public health.

Getting an entry into a physical fitness-training job is now not that easy as it once was. Previously what one needed to have was a good physique and a good knowledge of gymnasium procedures. At that time, people who were interested and proficient in bodybuilding naturally graduated to the level of physical trainers. But today, as people became more aware about health and fitness, they began to demand more from a trainer. Ideally, a fitness trainer should have a certificate from a well-known institution, he or she should have good inter-personal communication skills, and above all he or she should have excellent knowledge about fitness regime and medical aspects.

There are universities that provide certificate courses in physical fitness training. Some universities even conduct distance education courses. An ideal platform for launching a career into this field is a certificate from a good institution. One can find several institution that offer courses on fitness training through a simple search on the internet. Normally, these courses will cover fitness and health concepts, importance of nutrition, specific exercises such as yoga or meditation for relieving stress, specific fitness programs to prevent or heal common diseases, exercises for weight control, and procedures for gymnasium workout.

But the most important factor for succeeding as a physical fitness trainer is the aptitude for the job. The job aspirant should be genuinely interested in fitness activities and must be comfortable in handling both people and gymnasium equipment. One must also have an abundance of patience, as some people, especially senior citizens, take time to learn exercises and certain workouts properly.

Banana toffee cream tartlets

Banana toffee cream tartletsPreparation time:
20 mins plus 20 mins cooling
Cooking time:
2 hours

Ingredients

395g can sweetened condensed milk, unopened
3 bananas (1 very ripe,
2 ripe and firm)
8 small shortcut pastry cases (7-8cm in diameter)
120g 70% cocoa dark chocolate, roughly chopped
1 Tbsp cocoa powder, sifted
300ml thickened cream
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 whole nutmeg
Juice of ½ lemon
Extra brown sugar, to serve

Method

1. Put unopened can of milk in a medium saucepan. Fill pan with water, cover and boil for 2 hours. Top up with water, if needed, to keep can submerged. Remove can from water and set aside for at least 20 minutes to cool (to prevent caramelised milk bursting out when can is opened).

2. Spoon caramelised milk into a blender. Add very ripe banana and process briefly to combine.

3. Put pastry cases on an oven tray and pour caramel mixture into cases. Set aside at room temperature or put in fridge to cool completely.

4. Meanwhile, put chocolate in a food processor or spice grinder and pulse until finely chop. Transfer to a small bowl and toss through cocoa powder.

5. Put cream in a large bowl and whip until thick. Add brown sugar, cinnamon and 6 grates of nutmeg, then fold through to create a swirling pattern.

6. Finely slice remaining bananas on an angle and squeeze over lemon juice to prevent browning.

7. Top each tartlet with banana slices and a dollop of cream. Sprinkle over extra brown sugar and chocolate mixture to serve.